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South Harrow Market
Northolt Road
Harrow
HA2 0LY

Opening hours:
From 830 am to 6 pm

Arabic souvenirs in South Harrow

It is no longer difficult to find Arabic souvenirs in London, simply head to South Harrow market.

A wide selection of trinkets and keepsakes can be found in Um Ahmed's souvenirs' shop at the south-east entrance of the market in north London.

The old popular market of South Harrow, includes tens of tidy small andold- fashioned shops, perfect for a shopping trip, but also for a joyful tour.

Distinctive items

Visiting Um Ahmed's souvenirs' shop, you will discover numerous objects that represent the most famous Arabic cultural signs.

From renowned phrases engraved on wooden pieces and written in artistic calligraphy-style, to other items like replicas of mosques, different forms of beadrolls and Arabic coffee pots, Um Ahmed's is a perfect destination for Arabic knick-knacks.

Entering the shop, the scent of traditional Arabic perfumes fill the air.

A wide range of aromatic incense - stick incense, knead incense, liquid incense - are available at low costs.

Galabias (traditional Arabic clothing) and scarves worn by men and women ornamented with the Arabic embroidery adorn the walls of the shop and can be purchased for a reasonable price.

Handy and cheap

A visit to Um Ahmed's Arabic souvenirs' shop will not hurt your bank balance.

The price of the most expensive souvenirs and incense sticks ranges from £15 - £20, while many others do not exceed £3.

"I am here for only three years, but customers from different areas of London come to buy distinctive and cheap Arabic souvenirs," Um Ahmed says. "I order them from the Arab states."

Um Ahmed is from Somalia, and explains that when she at first ordered such goods, she was thinking of British people of Arabic origins. However, she was surprised to discover that most of her customers are completely British.

"They might have been to the Arab countries, but they did not buy any souvenirs. So they buy from here, instead."

Motasem Dalloul